His and Hers: TV parenting

His and Hers is a weekly discussion of a question or topic relating
to marriage. On Friday, my wife and I each write our thoughts on the week’s
topic. I invite others to do the same with their spouses as an exercise in
celebrating marriage.

What TV parents do you most want to be like?

Mrs. Happy’s response

Cliff and Clair Huxtable from The
Cosby Show
. They actually
talked and listened to their kids to resolve conflicts, they had a fantastic
sense of humor, and they were passionate toward each other.

Curt’s response

Rob and Laura Petrie from The
Dick Van Dyke Show
. They didn’t have everything figured out, but
they learned as they went along and had fun the whole way. They had loads
of humility and a wacky sense of humor about themselves, their son, work
life, home life, and everything else around them. I just hope I don’t trip
over an ottoman every time I come home. And I don’t intend to trade our
queen-size mattress for two twin beds.

4 thoughts on “His and Hers: TV parenting

  1. I always considered myself kinda’ like a Ward Cleaver. Or at least I wanted to be. I always thought he would be the coolest Dad to have around. Hmm, now that I say that, maybe I’m more like Wally, and …

    nevermind.

  2. I think I’d want to be like the Keatons from Family Ties. They were appropriately strict, appropriately laid-back, very approachable and were loved greatly by their kids.

    It’s funny – when I saw the title of this post in my feed reader, I thought it meant how parents use the TV with their kids. You know, you have that one thing you really need to get done but can’t do it because the kids keep demanding your attention. So you put on a video, get your work done, and voila! TV parenting.

  3. I think Atticus Finch (‘To Kill a Mockingbird’) sets a fairly high standard of fatherhood. I know he’s a literary father, but it was made into a movie, and I’m sure it’s been shown on television…

  4. I second the Huxtables. They loved their kids with all their hearts and showed it constantly, yet were never afraid to discipline them for their well-being. They never tried to be their kid’s friends. Only their parents. Plus they loved and respected each other with a passion!