Moving trumps blogging

In case you haven’t guessed, posting will be light for a while. Mrs.
Happy and I are trying to take care of the world’s best baby and pack up our
house for a cross-country move. Next week, we’ll be on the road. The week after
that, who knows?

Before I get back to packing, I thought I’d share this
character I made
using The Simpomaker, thanks to MCF.

And, just for fun, a retrospective of fictional incarnations of Curt I’ve
made over the years using online character generators:

with Hero Machine

South Park Create-a-Character

This was from a defunct page called Create Your Own Superhero.

Mrs. Happy drew these without the benefit of a generator:

No title

When I started blogging, I had time to write and ideas to communicate.
Later, life got busy, but the ideas kept flowing. Presently, I have nothing
but time. The idea synapses in my brain seem to have stopped firing—I assume
power
is being diverted to the taking-care-of-baby and the thinking-about-finances-and-moving-my-family-across-the-country
synapses.
Still, I have not lost my desire to blog. I feel like I ought to post at least
once a week just so readers don’t get too concerned.
Anyway, I’m still alive.

Baby Happy is not always happy. Right before he cries, he contorts his face
into the most devastatingly adorable frown. He gets that directly from his
mother.

I
spend quite a bit more time with my baby than I do with my computer. Tater’s
so cute, the iMac is lucky to get any Curt time at all.

Movie Review

There’s a movie called The
Exorcism of Emily Rose
. I never even thought
about seeing it during its theatrical release because it looked like a knock-off
of The Exorcist, which I don’t really care to see.
Recently, though, I came across a Christianity
Today
interview
with the writer
and
director
Scott
Derrickson. I was surprised to learn that a) he is a Christian, and b) TEoER is
a courtroom drama.

The court case is the prosecution of a priest charged with the negligent homicide
of a girl who died under his care after he attempted to rid her of demons.
The girl’s story is told in flashbacks—sometimes from different, incompatible
points of view—that supply all of the horror-genre scenes. The three main
players in the court case are the priest (Tom
Wilkinson
), his lawyer (Laura
Linney
), and the prosecutor (Campbell
Scott
). The priest, of course, wholly
believes that Emily Rose had been taken over by demons. The prosecutor, a devout
Methodist, believes Emily suffered from a medical condition in which epileptic
seizures led to psychosis. The defense attorney is an agnostic intent on defending
her client, but finds herself questioning her own personal beliefs about the
events leading to Emily’s death.

Mrs. Happy and I have watched this movie twice now. It will not receive
any Oscar nominations, but it’s worth checking out.

Q & A time with Curt: Christmas, etc.

I didn’t get to ask a question. Is it too late?
It’s never too late. Questions from readers save me the headache
of thinking up something to write about on my own.

What did you get for
your wife for Christmas, and why?
I got her three things:

  1. An I
    Love the ’80s
    board game. She loves this show on VH1 because
    it brings back great memories. The game also involves acting, singing, drawing,
    and trivia, all of which she loves as well.
  2. A package of ten fine-point gel pens with a marble finish, because she
    loves nice pens. When she opened the package and began sampling them,
    I was disappointed to learn that although the pens are ten different colors,
    they
    all contain
    black
    ink,
    which
    is no
    fun
    at
    all.
  3. A copy of the book PostSecret.
    It is a compilation of postcards from the art project of the same name. The
    associated web site describes
    it as "an ongoing community art project where people mail-in their secrets
    anonymously on one side of a homemade postcard." I knew it would appeal to
    Mrs. Happy as an artist and as a "people expert."

And, what did she get you for Christmas,
and why?

She got me one thing: the DVD for Serenity,
because I am a Firefly fanatic.
She made me something else: a shadowbox with four layered panes of glass that
each had some sort of handmade token to express love for our son. The glass layers
are backed by a hand drawn portrait of a sleeping Tater.

What was your favorite event or tradition that took place during
the holiday season this year?

We took Tater to church for the first time on Christmas Eve. He didn’t make
a sound, and he brought a smile to the face of everyone who saw him.

Name one artist, in any discipline, who has affected your life in some way.
C.S. Lewis. He showed me that highly intelligent people can have unshakable faith.

It’s going to be cold and gray for some months to come. There are no
good movies playing. You don’t want to venture far or spend a lot of
money, but sometimes the four walls of your home conspire to drive you mad
and you just need to go SOMEWHERE. What do you do?

I move back to Texas at the end of January. Along the way, maybe I even meet
some blogging friends for the first time. These friends, of course, should e-mail
me and let me know if they live between Long Island and Austin. We’ll try to
work it out.

University of Texas: 41, University of Southern California: 38

A visit from my dad trumped blogging last night. Tonight, the NCAA National
Championship kept me from the computer. My Longhorns silenced the scoffers,
ended 34-game
winning streak of the two-time defending champions (though now the second-best
team
in
the
country),
and
called
into
question
the
judgment
of
every Heisman
voter that favored Reggie Bush over Vince Young. Hook ‘em Horns!!!!!

On a different note, I’ve received more questions since my post on Monday,
which I will answer tomorrow. If you want to add a question or two of your
own, now is the time.

Q & A time with Curt: Writing, weddings, and stuff

One week ago, I announced a one-week vacation from blogging and made a promise
to return with a Q&A post. Several people left questions
for me, so here goes.

From other posts on your blog, it seems you make your living doing
some kind of writing, yes? If you don’t mind revealing it to the masses,
what kind
of work do you do?

It depends on what you mean by "make your living." When I have a job, it usually
involves writing of some sort. I have written technical manuals, sales copy,
marketing
materials, print ads, and one corporate Christmas card. I have a degree in journalism,
but I have never worked as a journalist and never intend to. You
may
have read some of my work if you have ever purchased a Dell PowerEdge server
and read
the
documentation
for the included OpenManage software, or if you have ever been a member of the
Computer Books Direct book club or the Reader’s Subscription book club. Currently,
though, I am not making any sort of living and not doing any sort of work because
I don’t have any sort of job. I have been on my own financially ever
since March
,
during which time I have worked many temporary jobs, all of which have involved
either writing or editing. Those of you who are praying people might continue
any prayers on my behalf.

Since I’m planning a wedding, what were some of the highlights
of yours, other than the fact that you married the wonderful Mrs. Happy?

Everything about my wedding was wonderful. The location, the music, the well-wishers,
the ceremony, the reception, the night that followed…it was absolutely the
best wedding I’ve ever attended. One thing to keep in mind when you’re planning
your wedding: it’s your wedding. Plan an event you’ll want to remember
for the rest of your life. Not everyone will like everything you plan. That’s
fine. They can forget about it tomorrow—you can’t. Other people don’t have
to approve of or even understand your choices. They just need to support
you in the vows that you make.

Any personal
things you did?

I sang a couple of songs during the prelude, including a duet with my friend
Matt. I also picked
out all the songs Matt sang during the prelude. My song choices were unconventional
(a
couple
of
show
tunes,
one
silly
song,
and
two
funeral songs), but I picked them all for very personal reasons.
This
was something not every guest approved of, but it was one of my favorite parts
of
the wedding.

And what is the funniest thing that happened?
Our youngest bridesmaid (12 years old) became sick during the ceremony. She
handed her bouquet to my sister, ran outside,
threw
up,
and then rejoined
the wedding party. She acted with such poise and discretion that most people
didn’t even notice. That’s what I think is the funniest thing, anyway. Most
other people seem to find a lot of humor in the fact that I cried like a
baby from the moment Mrs. Happy appeared until the moment we left the chapel.

Billygoat Ohio flotsam telegram! Grandstudio turntable blackjack?
I’m assuming you’re either a comment spammer or a Dadaist. Either way, I have
no use for you.

how to understand husband after marriage?
You asked this question through a search engine referral, but I’ll still answer
it. One of the main things that wives seem to have trouble understanding
is that their husbands do not think like a woman. So first of all, accept
the fact that when your husband speaks and acts, his motivations are not
what yours would be. Second, accept the fact that he needs your respect and
support, even especially when he doesn’t deserve it. Third, observe
his actions to discover how he expresses love and how he receives it. These
things should help you understand him. When in doubt, though, just talk to
him.

Would you please post another photo of the cutest baby in the world?
I just can’t get enough.

Neither can I.